Individual and combining effects of adding crushed seeds of nigela sativa and leaves of thymus vulgaris to layer diets on productive performance

Abstract

This study was conducted at the poultry farm belong to general health , College of Veterinary Medicine , University of AL- Anbar for(10)periods from 1/5/2008 to 7/2/2009 (280 days). This study was investigate the single and combine effects of adding different levels of crushed seeds of Nigella sativa and Leaves of Thymus Vulgaris to layer diets on a productive performance. One hundred and fifty Isa Brown laying hens at the age of 24 weeks were used in this study . The hens were individually weighed and randomly distributed in to ten treatments and each treatment with three replicates (5hens /replicate) as follows: T1(control) without any addition , T2,T3 and T4 included addition of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75% crushed seeds of Nigella sativa respectively, T5,T6 and T7 included addition of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75% crushed Thymus Vulgaris respectively, and treatments T8,T9 and T10 included combinations of crushed seeds of Nigella sativa and Thymus Vulgaris at levels 0.25:0.25, 0.50:0.50, 0.75:0.75%respectively.The results showed significant improvement (P<0.05) for all addition treatments in productive traits during most productive periods. treatment 3 was significantly improved (P<0.05) in accumulative egg production (H.D%) during period 1,2,3,5,6,7 and 8 followed by treatment 7 during period 5,7,8,9 and 10. Treatment 5 significantly improved over other treatments in average egg weight followed by treatment 7 which improved during summer and winter periods . Significant differences (P<0.05) among different treatments were found in accumulative means of egg mass during productive periods; treatment 7 and 3 were significantly improved (P<0.05) over other treatments for most productive periods , Significant differences among treatments were found in feed consumption and in feed conversion efficiency during all productive periods; Treatment 7 significantly improved (P<0.05) in feed conversion efficiency as compared with other treatments.