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Article
Evaluation of tactile sensation for apical root canal Obturation

Author: Abdul- haq A SULIMAN
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2001 Volume: 1 Issue: 3 Pages: 411-418
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

An accurate Working length is absolutely necessary for successful root canal treatment.Obturation of the root canal system forms the final Stage of root canal therapy and its success depends on obtaining perfect apical seal. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tactile sensation in obtaining an optimum obturation.Three hundred and fifty radiograph of root filled teeth taken after obturation of clinical cases evaluated in this study. The root canal prepared and the length was determined by the tactile sensation. After the obturation final radiograph to evaluate the obturation in the apical area was recorded. The films (284 radiographs included in the study) were divided according to the sex, position in the jaws and the type of tooth. Two observers evaluate the radiograph for apical obturation separately. Three categories were used: The first category, which is given a score of zero for optimal obturation(1) mm from the anatomical apex, The second category, which is given a score of one, is regarded as an underfilled root canal filling which is more than (1) mm from the anatomical apex. And finally the third category which is given a score of two which is regarded as an overfilled filling when there is extension of the filling material beyond the anatomical apex. The data were tabulated and a non-parametric chi square analysis was used for statistical test.The percentage of optimum apical obturation was found in (66.55%) of cases while those scored (1)was (28.9%) and those scored (2) was (46%). The analysis showed that there was no effect of the sex of the patient or between both jaws or with regard tooth type. The result of the study showed that, under the circumstances of this work, the tactile sensation produce results as effective as other methods of working length determination and could be justified, under the circumstances that limit the availability of other methods for working length determination and in particular the X - ray machine for the general dentist in Iraq upon which a harsh sanction is imposed which include scientific and health sanction


Article
Incidence of third root in mandibular permanent first molar: An endodontic challenge

Authors: Ali M Rashid --- Abdul–Haq A Suliman
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2006 Volume: 6 Issue: 2 Pages: 194-198
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

Aim: To investigate the incidence and the morphology of third root for the mandibular permanent firstmolars from indigenous Iraqi population and their significance in the successful of endodontictreatment. Materials and Methods: A clinical, radiographical prospective evaluation of firstmandibular permanent molar teeth (n= 788) and laboratory analysis of 695 extracted first mandibularpermanent molars collected from University Mosul, College of Dentistry, Department of ConservativeDentistry and private dental clinic were collected and examined. All the clinical cases treated as thirdroot present, unless otherwise both 90º, 20° mesial radiographical shift and trapezoidal access openingexcluded the presence of this macrostructure. The third root was classified in three groups on the basisof the curve of the root/root canal according to Ribeiro and Consolaro (1997). Chi–square was used todetermine the significance between both genders, whereas descriptive statistics was used to describethe result of observations. Results: Upon clinical and laboratory observation of total 1483 firstmandibular permanent molars, 121 (8.1%) exhibited radix entomolaris (RE), 17 (14%) were classifiedas type I (straight root/root canal), 33 (27.2%) as type II (an initially curved entrance and thecontinuation as a straight root/root canals) and 71(58.6%) as type III (an initial curve in the coronalthird of the root canal and a second buccally orientated curve starting from the middle to apical third). Statistical analysis with Chi–square indicated no significant differences between both genders regarding the occurrence of RE. In all cases, RE occurred bilaterally. Out of 71 teeth attended for clinic, 87.3% teeth required retreatment, while the apparent reason of extraction for 86% of 50 collected extracted teeth with RE seemed failure of endodontic treatment and the cleaning andobturation confined to the mesial and distal canals only. In all cases, the orifice of the RE was locateddistolingual from the main canal in the distal root. Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware of this unusual root morphology in mandibular first molars. Radiographs exposed at two different horizontal angles are needed to identify this additional root. The access cavity must be modified in a distolingual direction in order to visualize and treat the RE; this results in a trapezoidal access cavity.


Article
Temperature rise beneath a light–cured materials using two types of curing machines

Authors: Abdul–Haq A Suliman --- Sabah A Ismail
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2006 Volume: 6 Issue: 1 Pages: 20-25
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

Aim: To measure the temperature rise induced by a light emitting diode (LED) curing unit and byquartz tungsten halogen (QTH) curing unit using two types of composite resin XRV Herculite andVenus. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted non–carious single canal premolars were cleaned andbisected longitudinally. Class V preparations were cut on the buccal surfaces. The teeth were dividedinto four groups; each of ten. The teeth in the first and second groups were restored with XR–Herculitecomposite resin. The teeth in the third and fourth groups were restored with Venus composite resin.The composite resin in the first and third groups were polymerized using QTH curing unit “Astralis”for 40 seconds; the light intensity was 502 mW/cm2. The distance between the tip of the light and thecomposite was 3 + 1 mm. The composite resin in the second and fourth groups was polymerized usingLEDs “Ultra–Lite 200 E plus” curing unit for 20 seconds; the light intensity was 536 mW/cm2 usingthe same distance as the first and third groups. The temperature rise at the pulpal wall was recorded byplacing a thermocouple on the pulpal wall directly under the restoration. Results: The lowesttemperature rise during LED irradiation with Venus composite resin followed by LED irradiation withXRV Herculite composite resin. Whereas QTH curing units with XRV Herculite composite resinproduced higher values, QTH curing units with Venus composite resin produced the highesttemperature rise. Conclusion: The temperature rise of LED curing units and QTH curing units used inthis study was under the limits that affect the integrity of the dental pulp.


Article
Dentist laboratory communication

Authors: Sabah A Ismail --- Abdul–Haq A Suliman
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2004 Volume: 4 Issue: 2 Pages: 143-149
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the common errors that may occur during crown and bridge construction. Four hundred stone models were used in this study for fabrication of 265 bridges and 135 single crown. The total number of units was 1141. Four main parameters were evaluated for each stone model: General informa-tion about the case, the condition of the stone model, the type of impression mater-ial and the prepared abutment tooth. The result of this study showed that 33.7% of the models were one unit and 48.7% of the models were 2–4 units and the remaining 17.5% of the models were more than five units, 8.7% of the models were without opposing arch. Alginate impression materials were used in 95% of the cases and only 5% of the cases elastomeric impression material were used. The finishing line was absent in 19.7% of the cases. Enough tooth reduction was done in 61.3% of the cases and 16.3% of the cases showed too much tooth reduction while 22.4% of the cases the tooth reduction was not enough. In order to avoid these errors continuous education courses and journal club are highly recommended.


Article
The effect of amalgam alloy types, surface treatments, and bonding agents on the shear bond strength between amalgam and resin composite

Authors: Raghad A. Rasheed --- Abdul–Haq A. Suliman
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2006 Volume: 6 Issue: 3 Pages: S38-S47
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

To evaluate the effect of amalgam alloy types, surface treatments, bonding agents, on the shear bond strength between set amalgam and resin composite restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and thirty eight holes (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm depth) prepared in a 2x2.5 cm cold cure acrylic resin blocks in which amalgam was condensed. The 338 samples were divided into two groups, the control group which consisted of 26 intact amalgam samples, and the repair group consisted of 312 repair amalgam samples. Each group (intact, and repair) was subdivided into two groups according to the type of amalgam alloy. Half of the samples were filled with spherical amalgam alloy and the other were filled with admixed amalgam alloy. The repair samples then divided in to four groups according to the surface treatment, in turn each sub-group divided into three groups according to the bonding agent. The samples were thermocycled, before shear bond strength was tested. The mode of failure was observed for each specimen. Results and Conclusion: The statistical analysis showed that the repair strength was 50% of the intact strength, and the admixed amalgam samples showed higher shear bond strength than spherical amalgam samples. The group roughened with diamond bur showed higher repair bond strength than the groups received other surface treatment. The use of dentin bonding agent (All–Bond 2 and Alloybond) would increase the repair bond strength between the amalgam and the composite restorative materials. And the mode of failure was mostly an adhesive type.


Article
Bleaching effect on surface roughness and microhardness of dentin

Authors: Abdul-haq A SULIMAN --- Neam N YUOSFANI
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2002 Volume: 2 Issue: 1 Pages: 20-26
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

The main objectives of this study were to determine the effects of the bleaching solutions on the surface characteristics of dentin namely, microhardness and surface roughness. Sixteen dentin samples were prepared for the measurements. Teeth mounted in an acrylic resin blocks for microhardness measurements and surface roughness. The bleaching was performed by immersion of each sample in (35%) hydrogen peroxide at (37)°C in an incubator for a period of one hour. Vicker'smicrohardness instruments used for microhardness measurements and profilometertesting machine was used to evaluate surface Toughness. Two measurements were taken from each samples one before and the other after bleaching procedure. The data were collected and analyzed using analysis of variance and t-test, The results showed that the microhardness of dentin is greater before bleaching than the mean after bleaching procedures. This indicated that the bleaching solution used in this study reduced the microhardness of the dentin in vitro. There are slight changes in the mean value of the surface roughness of dentin after bleaching, which is statistically not significant.

Keywords

Bleaching --- roughness --- microhardness


Article
Fluoride release from different tooth colored restorative materials: An in vitro study

Authors: Manal A AL-TAEE --- Abdul-haq A SULIMAN
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2001 Volume: 1 Issue: 3 Pages: S215-S228
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

This in vitro study evaluated the amount of fluoride released from fluoride-containing materials over a period of (30) days. Twenty eight disk samples (2.5 mm depth × 10 mm diameter) were prepared and divided into four groups: GroupI Vitremer glass ionomer, group II resin composite Tetric, group III resin composite Definite, and group IV Compoglass.The samples were stored in an incubator at 37°C for (24) hours. Each disk was suspended in an individual plastic tube containing (3) ml of deionized water. The water was changed every (24) hours, fluoride release was determined at each day for (30) days, after buffering the solution with equal volume of TISAB. The fluoride release was measured with a fluoride-ion selective specific electrode previously calibrated from (0.05) to (100) ppm. Fluoride release was expressed in part per million (ppm).ANOVA test was used to evaluate the data. The results revealed that Vetrimer glass ionomer released significantly more fluoride (4l ppm) for the first day than all the other products. This was followed by Compoglass which exhibits more fluoride release than the other two types (32 ppm), the Tetric composite resin Was the third material in the amount of fluoride released (3.75 ppm), and finally the resin composite Definite released fluoride in about (0.75 ppm). All fluoride release was decreased from day (1) to (30) observation period.


Article
Clinical evaluation of resin - bonded bridges

Authors: Sabah A ISMAIL --- Abdul-haq A SULIMAN --- Ma,an M NAYEF
Journal: Al-Rafidain Dental Journal مجلة الرافدين لطب الأسنان ISSN: 18121217 Year: 2001 Volume: 1 Issue: 1 Pages: 35-39
Publisher: Mosul University جامعة الموصل

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Abstract

This study evaluated resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (FPDs) clinically. Forty patients received 40 resin-bonded FPDs. Two types of luting materials were used, Super Bond Crown and Bridge Material and Degufill SC composite.The metal frame works for Super Bond Crown and Bridge Material were sandblasted only, and for Degufill SC composite were electrolytically etched, Clinical evaluation were performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after cementation. None of the prostheses bonded by Super Bond Crown and Bridge Material lost retention, whereas two of the acid etched retainers required replacement after one year, Resin bonded prostheses appear to be favorable alternative to other types of fixed partial dentures.

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